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Oct 04 2018

Aquaculture training workshop (24 – 28 September 2018) in Kenya

The inserted group picture was taken in the opening of the “Aquaculture training workshop” which was conducted during the period 24 to 28 September in Nairobi (Kenya). The event took place in the premise of Kenya Forestry Research Institute (KEFRI).

During the 5-day event, we went through a variety of training tools to ensure an active engagement of the workshop participants including a preliminary lecture delivered by myself starting with the world aquaculture, then African aquaculture before focusing on Kenyan aquaculture. The workshop had a brain storming session in which each participant responded to the issues of concern related to the development of aquaculture in Kenya along with priority setting for possible reasons. The outcomes of this session as long as the presented constraints were crucial for formulating the way forward session where we together were able not only to set a production target for aquaculture in Kenya by also to identify the tools required for the implementation of a short-term plan towards achieving the agreed upon production target. The field visits have been carried out over two days. We visited a fish farm (food fish & ornamental fish), feed mill, training center, and an aquaponic project. During the mission and in linkage with the main agenda of the event, I was able to present a full lecture on the planning of aquaculture projects as well as specific parts on fish genetics and others. These visits are expected to be posted for educational purposes under separate covers.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the KEFRI staff and the course coordinator who did their best and facilitated the day-to-day activities. Special thanks go to the course participants for their dedication to the course and for their active interactions whether in the class room or during the field visits which were essential for having a fruitful and successful workshop. I am grateful to all who made my stay in Kenya an enjoyable experience.

This initiative which is a component of South-South Cooperation between Egypt and Kenya have been supported by Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries (Kenya), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Egyptian International Center for Agriculture (EICA) and Egyptian Agency of Partnership for Development (EAPD)

The workshop participants are: Hendrick Owori, Olive Theuri, Justin Ireri, George Akunga, Zachary Winam, Ann Kimotho, Raphael Mbaluka, Morris M James, and Susan Odinga.

 

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Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14587

Oct 02 2018

Aquaculture training workshop (17 – 21 September 2018) in Tanzania

 

The inserted group picture was taken in the opening of the “Aquaculture training workshop” which was conducted during the period 17 to 21 September in Kilimanjaro (Tanzania) and organized by Kilimanjaro Agricultural Training Center (KATC). During the 5-day event, we went through a variety of training tools to ensure the most active participation of the workshop participant including a preliminary lecture by myself starting with the world aquaculture, then African aquaculture before focusing on Tanzanian Aquaculture. The workshop had a brain storming session in which each participant responded to the issues of concern related to the development of aquaculture in Tanzania. The analysis of the brain storming session was crucial for formulating the way forward session where we together were able not only to set a production target for aquaculture in Tanzania by also to identify the tools required for the implementation of a short-term plan towards achieving the agreed upon production target. The event included field visits to fish farms as well as to fish markets which will be posted under separate covers.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the course participants and organizers who provided all possible efforts to have a fruitful and successful workshop. I am grateful to all who made my stay in Tanzania an enjoyable experience.

This initiative which is a component of South-South Cooperation between Egypt and Tanzania have been supported by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Egyptian International Center for Agriculture (EICA) and Egyptian Agency of Partnership for Development (EAPD)

The workshop participants are:

DR. NICHROUS MLALILA, PUDENSIANA C.PANGA, JOHN MAPUNDA, RAPHAEL PAUL MAHINYA, ALONGA JOHN OSWALD, LUCKA PASCAL MGWENA, JULIET EVANCE, DEBORA AMSI, HIYARI CHONA, FATMA SULEIMAN, SALIM MWINJALA, EMMANUEL L.MAKONINDE

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14584

Aug 30 2018

Small-scale aquaculture in rural development (Updated 2018 version)

 

 

The content of this lecture includes the features of rural communities, models of small-scale aquaculture projects, planning & promoting small-scale aquaculture, challenges & Issues of concern, and examples of small-scale projects. Case studies have been included in the lecture. Main related issues have been addressed such as subsidies, adaption curve have been addressed. The lecture highlighted the need for developing country-specific criteria for the small-scale aquaculture operations based on size, inputs, outcomes, investment, labor and others.

Small-scale aquaculture in Rural Development (Updated 2018 version)

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14576

Aug 17 2018

Touring the fish display in Zorritos market (Mercado de Zorritos) – Tumbes, Peru

Photo credit: Samart Detsathit (Thailand)

Review: Samart Detsathit and Abdel Rahman El Gamal (Founder of the website)

In the fish part of the Zorritos market, fresh fish and seafood are displayed and sold. Because the market is next to the beach where a large number of fishing boats land the catch, the freshness of fish in this market is usually excellent. There are many fish species displayed in this market including barracuda, little tuna, mackerel, croaker etc. and lobster as well.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14567

Jul 31 2018

Fish hatchery management (Updated 2018 version)

This lecture on the management starts general information related to the modes of reproduction in various groups of aquatic organisms as illustrated by pictures and tables highlighting the significant differences in the modes of reproduction among various fish groups ranging from scattering eggs to giving birth passing by the key related information such as fecundity, parental care and other reproduction parameters. The focus of the lecture has been placed on the hatchery technology of fish species giving examples of various groups of finfishes and crustaceans in freshwater and marine waters including acquiring broodstock, hatchery facilities, reproduction technology (natural – artificial) and the relation of adopted technologies to the biology of fish as well as the economic considerations. The lecture addressed the quality of hatchery production whether through genetic enhancement or biosecurity measures such as vaccination or disease-free protocols.

Fish Hatchery management (Updated 2018 version)

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14560

Jul 28 2018

Cage farming of marine fish in Bang-pat village, Pung-nga province (Thailand)

Photos credit: Samart Detsathit (Thailand)

Review: Samart Detsathit and Abdel Rahman El Gamal (Founder of the website)

The inserted picture shows sea cages in which grouper, seabass and red snapper are cultured. The cage farm is located in Bang-pat which is a fisherman’s village.

All houses of the village are in the sea near the mangroves (not on land). This village was promoted and become a famous tourist place. Many tourists come to learn culture (especially the village is a Muslim one), buy fishery product and eat very fresh seafood that is also inexpensive. One can spot a floating restaurant in the picture.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14553

Jul 23 2018

Breeding of seahorse in Thailand

Photos credit: Samart Detsathit (Thailand)

Review: Samart Detsathit and Abdel Rahman El Gamal (Founder of the website)

The breeding of seahorse species has begun in Thailand around 2010 where the reproduction of several species of seahorse have been attempted including Hippocampus spinosissimus, H barbouri (original from Philippines), H mohnikei, H kellogi, H kuda, H komes and H trimaculatus.

The aim of seahorse reproduction is to be released in natural water for stock enhancement. The hatchery shown in one of the picture belongs to the Coastal Aquaculture Research and Development Regional Center (under the Department of Fisheries).

The seahorse shown in the glass aquarium are H kuda of 7-day old, the white bowl shows 10-day old stage of the same species while the last picture is for H barbouri of 40-day old juveniles.

In this particular facility, 35,000 seahorse juveniles have been produced and restocked in natural waters.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14540

Jul 18 2018

Development and outlook of Egyptian aquaculture – 2018 Updated version

I delivered this lecture in the opening day of the 3-month training course (Fish Culture Development –Africa) on 16 July 2018. The official statistics have been used to develop the lecture. The over-all fish production systems have been addressed followed by the mode of development.  I tried to analyze and highlight the key point related to the features of aquaculture including the species composition, types of aquaculture, emerging systems and others. The production inputs of seed (hatcheries) and feed (feed mills) are covered in the lecture. Relating Egyptian aquaculture to the regional and world aquaculture has been addressed whenever required. The lecture included the Institutional framework and governing regulations. Fish trade (import and export) has been addressed in the lecture. Typically, this lecture starts and ends with human resources and capacity building.

Development and outlook of Egyptian aquaculture (2018)

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14536

Jul 17 2018

Fish Culture Development – Africa (2018) training course

 

The inserted photo was taken on July 16, the first technical day of the “Fish Culture Development – Africa” training course for 2018. This 3-month course is being annually organized since 2004 by the Egyptian International Center for Agriculture – EICA” and jointly supported by EICA and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The course this year hosts 13 participants from 10 African countries. The photo shows Dr. Abdel Rahman El Gamal and the course participants:

Aholoukpe Cyrille (Benin), Daniel Lingomo, Clemence Valire, and Samy Ndala (DR Congo), Jean Ampere (Gabon),  Alhassan Arafat  Salifu (Ghana),  Winfred Kyalo (Kenya),  Ratsitohaina Lala Mihaja (Madagascar),  Oluwaseun Osiyoye (Nigeria),  Zeinab Elamin (Sudan), Abdulmalik  Kashaigiri (Tanzania),  Elijah Ssennyonjo and  Kanakutanda James Henry (Uganda)

 

Note: Please note that my contribution to the EICA courses is just teaching and supervising group projects. In other words, I am not the one to be asked about participation procedures in EICA courses. Whoever is interested is advised to visit the EICA website: http://eicaeg.org/home.html

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14530

Jun 22 2018

Use of chlorine compounds for eradicating the left-over organisms from fish ponds (Video)

Video credit: Zanou Dossou (Togo)

Review: Abdel Rahman El Gamal (Founder of the video channel)

 

Before starting any fish farming operation, it is essential that culture unit is free of aquatic organisms which could be accidently left-over from earlier operation whether in fry nursing or grow-out. While this matter is simple in completely drained tanks and/or ponds, it turns a real concern in situations where culture units cannot be completely drained. Small water buddies scattered in earthen ponds could be sufficient to host various organisms including fish fry, fingerlings, molluscs, insects, snails and others. In fact, the adults of some hardy species can survive un-noticed in watery footprints (e.g. tilapia and African catfish). These left-over organisms –depending on their types and densities- may threaten the following crops, and so the eradication of such organisms is a must to ensure a safe crop.

There is a long list of compounds which can be used for such disinfection process. The effectiveness, availability and cost are criteria used in choosing a given disinfectant. Moreover, the easiness of neutralizing the applied substance is an important criterion to consider.

The video shows the use of chlorine solution for the eradication of possible left over organisms. As the remained water scattered in the pond is not easy to estimate, the volume and concentration of chlorine required for such task would depend on personal experience as well as the immediate reaction of organisms that may occur in shown water buddies. In such situations, fish farmers may lean more to overdosing than under-dosing.

It is often recommended to allow water sufficient to cover the whole pond bottom before the application of chlorine. Doing so will ensure a better mixing of chlorine solution with the entire bottom water. Afterwards, and before stocking the fish, no sign of life should be observed in treated water otherwise, repeating the process is possible.

The most common chlorine source used in aquaculture ponds are calcium hypochlorite whether in the form of powder or tablets.

After a day or two of the chlorine applications, pond water is raised and the dead organisms are netted out before stocking the new batch of farmed organisms.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14523

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