Dec 25 2017

Use of Black Soldier Fly larvae in fish feeding in Egypt (Video)

I filmed this video during my visit to an aquaponic facility owned and managed by Dr. Hisham Haggag. The visit took place on 2 November, 2017.

Introduction: The larvae of the Black soldier fly (SFD), (Hermetia illucens) have been proposed decades ago as an efficient converter of organic wastes into live and highly nutritional biomass which could be utilized in different purposes. Their brief life cycle along with their friendly nature encouraged the large-scale production of the BSF larvae and expanded their utilization in animal and fish feeds.

Production of BSF larvae: Even though there is no particular care needed for SFD adults as they do not feed, it is necessary to maintain all-year round SFD adults to ensure sustainable production of SFD larvae. While greenhouses are recommended for maintaining adults, the warm temperature under greenhouse will be required for efficient biodegradation of the waste and so the production of SFD larvae mass especially in temperate climates whereas ambient temperatures are most likely below optimum for such operation. The greenhouse size needs to be of adequate size to allow the aerial mating of adults and hence the continuation of life cycle; about 70-m2 greenhouse has been recommended. Laying females are attracted to deposit their eggs in moist medium inside the greenhouse.

Once eggs hatch, the larvae start immediately consume whatever available of waste products such as home-based food wastes, poultry and animal manure and they continue to do that until they reach their full maturity in about two weeks. Throughout the culture period, optimum temperature ranges from 29-31 ºC while relative humidity should be between 50 and 70%. It may worth mentioning that the duration of life cycle can vary from several weeks to several months depending on the culture environment especially the ambient temperature and the available waste products (larval diet) in regard to quality and quantity.

Advantages: The larvae of black soldier fly are efficient in digesting and converting the organic wastes into valuable biomass in an environmentally friendly action. Large volumes of organic wastes can be processed by dense population of BSF larvae. Therefore, such conversion while controlling the accumulation of organic pollutants, nutritionally rich live biomass is produced. On dry-matter basis, the BSF larvae contain 40-45% protein, 30-35% lipids, 11-15% ash, 8-9% moisture and 7-8% fiber.

The quick processing of organic waste restrains bacterial growth and thereby reduces the production of bad odors which is also reduced via aerating and drying the organic wastes that results from the moving larvae.

It may worth mentioning that the BSF adults lack functioning mouth parts and hence they do not come into contact to human and are not considered a nuisance.

Interestingly, the processed organic wastes by BSF larvae turn it into a liquid form that becomes less suitable for housefly larvae leading to reducing the housefly populations will be of value especially in places where the house fly are abundant such as in livestock farms.

Utilization: Fish meal being the most expensive component in fish feed, aquaculturists have attempted all-time to find appropriate replacement of fish meal whether from plant or animal based protein sources.

The nutritional value of the Black soldier fly larvae along with the easiness to culture and copied with their environmental friendly nature have placed this organism among the possible candidates to be used in fish farming. The BSF larvae has been already in use in some aquaculture operations in many countries whereas the larvae is used live, chopped or dried before mixing it with feed. The use of other animal protein sources in fish feed rather than fish meal has attracted fish farmers who oppose the use of fish meal in fish feeds. In fact, outcomes were encouraging when the BSF larvae were used in the diet of several fish species including rainbow trout, channel catfish, tilapia and others.

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14264

Dec 23 2017

Use of oval structure in the breeding of river fishes in Uganda

Credit: Godfrey Byaruhanga (Uganda)

 

 

In such breeding system, fish gets conditioned to flowing water and follows the direction opposite to the current. During this period, the broodfish starts to breed. Such fish species include Nile perch, Chinese carps (in particular grass carp).

The oval construction is composed of water outlets with control valves. When the valve is opened, the water under high pressure is pushed through the outlet pipe making anti-clockwise water circulation.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14262

Dec 23 2017

A typical fish pond in Zimbabwe

Photo credit: James Lungile Dhlomo (Zimbabwe)

Review: James Lungile Dhlomo and Abdel Rahman El Gamal (Founder of the website)

 

The inserted picture shows a typical fish located in Nabusenga Irrigation Scheme of Binga District, Zimbabwe. The average size of the pond is 2000 m2 (20 x 10 m). The species commonly farmed is Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. In this particular location, tilapia fingerlings are brought from a hatchery located at Kariba (600 km distance). The growing season is about 8 months. During which, fish are fed artificial feed consisting mainly locally available food stuff and byproducts. A large size tilapia of up to 800-g is produced after the growing season. According to FAO statistics, total aquaculture production in Zimbabwe amounted 10,600 tons in 2015.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14259

Dec 16 2017

Fish Culture Development training course – Regular (Graduation) Egypt – EICA (2017)

 

On Thursday, 14 December 2017 the graduation of the Fish Culture Development training course took place at the premise of the Egyptian International Centre for Agriculture (EICA). The graduation ceremony hosted four more courses; a course on aquaculture (Africa), soil and water, animal production and post-harvest.

The inserted picture was taken several days before the graduation. The course participants and EICA staff present in the picture are:

The 20 course participants who represent 19 countries are: Mr. Anas Al Islam (Bangladesh), Mr. Raul Alberto Guardia Quino (Bolivia), Ms. Marleyi Acuna Torres and Ms. Sandra Magally  Sanchez Trujillo (Colombia), Mr. Awazi Kambi (DRC-Congo), Ms. Jainaba Jaiteh (Gambia), Mr. Eric Osei-Gyebi (Ghana), Ms. Cele Anaitte Mendez Garcia (Guatemala), Mr. Jalal Momani (Jordan), Mr. Hanan Mohd Yusof (Malaysia), Mr. Soumeilou  Sidibe (Mali), Mr. Faridullah khan (Pakistan), Ms.Vivian Quiros (Panama), Mr. Jhons Huayanay Ostos (Peru), Mr. Mamadou Sileye Niang (Senegal), Mr. El-Hag Ambrajo Juma (South Sudan), Mr. Mamoun Ahmed (Sudan), Mr. Bilali Banali (Tanzania), Ms. Gersy Daniela Ruiz Arreaza (Venezuela) and Mr. James Lungile Dhlomo (Zimbabwe).

From EICA, Eng. Yehia El Sayed (EICA Director General), Eng. Taghreed Said (Course coordinator), Eng. Hend and Eng. Ibrahim (Course assistants) are present in the picture. Since I was lecturing in that day, I was invited to join.

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14253

Dec 16 2017

Fish Culture Development training course- Africa (Graduation) EICA – Egypt (2017)

 

 

On Thursday, 14 December 2017 the graduation of the Fish Culture Development training course took place at the premise of the Egyptian International Centre for Agriculture (EICA). The graduation ceremony hosted four more courses; a regular course on aquaculture, soil and water, animal production and post-harvest.

The inserted picture was taken several days before the graduation. The course participants and EICA staff present in the picture are:

Mr. Gideon Gicheru, Mr. Jesee Maina Nyokabi and Ms. Mercy maiyo (Kenya), Mr. Muriisa Emmanuel (Rwanda); Mr. Assam Eldeen Mohamed, Mr. Mutasim Yousif and Ms. Fatima yousif (Sudan); Mr. Raphael Mahinya, Mr.Oswald John Alonga, Mr. Lucka Paschal, Ms. Jamila Ibrahim and Ms. Pudensiana C. Panga (Tanzania); and Mr. David Mubeezi, Mr. Nuwasiima Saverino, Mr. Byaruhanga Godfrey and Mr. Naturinda Brighton (Uganda).

From EICA, Eng. Yehia El Sayed (EICA Director General), Eng. Taghreed Said (Course coordinator), Eng. Hend and Eng. Ibrahim (Course assistants) are present in the picture. Since I was lecturing in that day, I was invited to join.

 

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Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14249

Dec 14 2017

Climate change in Mauritius

A permission from the report owners has been granted to publish the report on this website

cover-climate-change-in-mauritius

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[gview file=”http://fishconsult.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Climate-Change-in-Mauritius.pdf”]

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=13771

Nov 30 2017

A tour in a fish market in Heliopolis (Cairo – Egypt) – Video

 

 

 

This video was filmed in a fish market located in Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt). The display shows variety of fin fishes, shrimp, squid, and mussel. Tilapia and Nile perch are the key finfish species. As seen in the video, the processing and cooking may take place in the shop depending on the consumer preference.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14242

Nov 28 2017

Climate Change seminar (Egypt, EICA, 25-27 November, 2017)

The Egyptian International Centre for Agriculture (EICA) organized a 3-day seminar on the climate change. The event was attended by about 90 participants who are already participating in four training courses hosted by EICA at the moment; two courses are on fish culture, a course is on animal production while the 4th course is on soil and water. The event included country presentations, discussions ending by recommendations. Typically, three languages were used in this event; English, French and Spanish whereas simultaneous translation enabled a decent information flow among all seminar attendants.  The inserted picture was taken for the experts who moderated the event. They are from right to left: Prof. Seif El Din Attalla, Prof. Bahgat Edrise, Prof. Diaa El Qosy and I (Abdel Rahman El Gamal).

The represented 36 countries in this event are:

Argentina, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burundi, Chile, Colombia,  Congo Brazzaville, Costa Rica, Coted’ Ivoire, DR Congo, El Salvador, Gambia, Ghana, Georgia, Guatemala, Jordon, Kenya, Liberia, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Venezuela, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14239

Nov 28 2017

Communal construction of fish ponds in Tanzania

Photo credit: Lucka Paschal and Erick Kiiza (Tanzania)

Review: Lucka Paschal – Erick Kiiza (Tanzania) and Abdel Rahman El Gamal (Founder of the website)

 

 

 

The fish pond shown in the picture is located in Songea (Tanzania). Most of individual fish farmers rely on their own man power upon constructing a fish pond within the community. Traditionally, people in the community help each other while no cash involved. In such situations, the depth of digging is usually based on personal judgment in order to avoid reaching the underground water which if reached would represent a real challenge and could interfere with proper management of the fish pond.

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14184

Nov 28 2017

Tilapia overwintering in a fish hatchery in Tanzania

Photo credit: Lucka Paschal and Erick Kiiza (Tanzania)

Review: Lucka Paschal – Erick Kiiza (Tanzania) and Abdel Rahman El Gamal (Founder of the website)

 

 

The inserted picture shows a private tilapia hatchery located in Muleba, at Kagera Region. In order to save tilapia stocks against cold weather during winter period, the farmer covers the hatchery unit as shown in the picture and depending on the insulation efficiency of the cover, this practice targets warming up the water inside the facility and hence help not only save the stocks but also condition them for successful reproduction seasons.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://fishconsult.org/?p=14190

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